Tuesday, May 15, 2012

African Monkeys Review

Old World Monkeys—those that live in Africa and Asia—are significantly different from the New World monkeys of South and Central America. In fact, they are more closely related to the apes (chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans and gibbons) than they are to the less highly-evolved primates of the American rainforests. Old World monkeys tend to be larger than those of the New World and they also tend to live in social groups that are more highly organized. None of them has the prehensile tail that is so characteristic of monkeys in the Americas. Types of old-world monkeys include: The baboon-like mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) of the West African rainforests is the world’s largest monkey as well as the most colorful. Males average 25 kilos (55-60 pounds) in weight, and some specimens reach 110 pounds (50 kilos). The face and rump of the male mandrill turn brightly multi-colored when the animal reaches sexual maturity. Mandrills forage across the rainforest floor in huge troops of up to several hundred individuals. Baboons, depending on which of the five species they belong to, can grow almost as large as mandrills. All species live in Africa, with the Guinea baboon (Papio papio) of West Africa reaching a weight of around 14 kg (30 pounds) and the chacma baboon (Papio ursinus) of southern Africa growing as large as 40 kilos (90 pounds). Like the mandrill, baboons live in troops that are dominated by the larger male animals. Their primary predator is the leopard. Next to humans, the macaque is the most widespread of primates, with 22 species inhabiting diverse ecosystems from North Africa to Japan. Because some species of macaque lack tails, they have sometimes been confused with apes—which they are not. One of the most familiar macaque species is the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) of India, Southeast Asia and southern China. The IUCN lists a number of the numerous macaque species as endangered; several that are native to small Indonesian islands are listed as critically endangered. Langurs comprise more than a dozen long-tailed, leaf- flower- and bud-eating monkey species that range from India through Southeast Asia and Indonesia. One species, the Hanuman langur (Semnopithecus entellus), is named for the Indian god Hanuman, and is the sacred monkey of India. Depending on sex and species, sizes range from around 12 pounds (7 kg) to 40 pounds. Some langurs spend most of their time foraging on the ground; others, like the Javan langur (Trachypithecus auratus) pictured here, are primarily arboreal. The IUCN lists 18 species of langur as either “endangered” or “critically endangered.” The rain forests of Africa are home to five species of black-and-white colobus monkey and nine species of red colobus monkey. One thing all the colobus species have in common is that, unlike other monkeys, they lack opposable (bendable and useful) thumbs on their hands. Colobus monkeys spend most of their time in the rainforest canopy, where they frequently and acrobatically leap from tree to tree. They live in groups that are led by a dominant male. Red colobus monkeys are known for being the favorite prey animal of male chimpanzees on the hunt. The IUCN lists five of the nine







Facts about lions

The lion (Panthera leo) is one of the four big cats in the genus Panthera, and a member of the family Felidae. With some males exceeding 250 kg (550 lb) in weight, it is the second-largest living cat after the tiger. Wild lions currently exist in Sub-Saharan Africa and in Asia with an endangered remnant population in Gir Forest National Park in India, having disappeared from North Africa and Southwest Asia in historic times. Until the late Pleistocene, about 10,000 years ago, the lion was the most widespread large land mammal after humans. They were found in most of Africa, across Eurasia from western Europe to India, and in the Americas from the Yukon to Peru. The lion is a vulnerable species, having seen a possibly irreversible population decline of thirty to fifty percent over the past two decades in its African range. Lion populations are untenable outside designated reserves and national parks. Although the cause of the decline is not fully understood, habitat loss and conflicts with humans are currently the greatest causes of concern. Within Africa, the West African lion population is particularly endangered. Lions live for ten to fourteen years in the wild, while in captivity they can live longer than twenty years. In the wild, males seldom live longer than ten years, as injuries sustained from continual fighting with rival males greatly reduce their longevity. They typically inhabit savanna and grassland, although they may take to bush and forest. Lions are unusually social compared to other cats. A pride of lions consists of related females and offspring and a small number of adult males. Groups of female lions typically hunt together, preying mostly on large ungulates. Lions are apex and keystone predators, although they scavenge as opportunity allows. While lions do not typically hunt humans, some have been known to do so. Highly distinctive, the male lion is easily recognised by its mane, and its face is one of the most widely recognised animal symbols in human culture. Depictions have existed from the Upper Paleolithic period, with carvings and paintings from the Lascaux and Chauvet Caves, through virtually all ancient and medieval cultures where they once occurred. It has been extensively depicted in sculptures, in paintings, on national flags, and in contemporary films and literature. Lions have been kept in menageries since the time of the Roman Empire and have been a key species sought for exhibition in zoos over the world since the late eighteenth century. Zoos are cooperating worldwide in breeding programs for the endangered Asiatic subspecies.
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Saturday, March 3, 2012

Sparrow Photos & Info

You can find House Sparrows most places where there are houses (or other buildings), and few places where there aren’t. Along with two other introduced species, the European Starling and the Rock Pigeon, these are some of our most common birds. Their constant presence outside our doors makes them easy to overlook, and their tendency to displace native birds from nest boxes causes some people to resent them. But House Sparrows, with their capacity to live so intimately with us, are just beneficiaries of our own success.
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Saturday, February 25, 2012

Sea Gull Bird Review

Gulls (often informally called seagulls) are birds in the family Laridae. They are most closely related to the terns (family Sternidae) and only distantly related to auks, skimmers, and more distantly to the waders. Until the twenty-first century most gulls were placed in the genus Larus, but this arrangement is now known to be polyphyletic, leading to the resurrection of several genera.

Gulls are typically medium to large birds, usually grey or white, often with black markings on the head or wings. They typically have harsh wailing or squawking calls, stout, longish bills, and webbed feet. Most gulls, particularly Larus species, are ground-nesting carnivores, which will take live food or scavenge opportunistically. Live food often includes crabs and small fish. Gulls have prophylactic unhinging jaws which allow them to consume large prey. Apart from the kittiwakes, gulls are typically coastal or inland species, rarely venturing far out to sea The large species take up to four years to attain full adult plumage, but two years is typical for small gulls. Large White-Headed Gulls are typically long-lived birds, with a maximum age of 49 years recorded for the Herring Gull.

Monday, February 13, 2012

Swan A Very Beautiful Bird :)

Swans, genus Cygnus, are birds of the family Anatidae, which also includes geese and ducks. Swans are grouped with the closely related geese in the subfamily Anserinae where they form the tribe Cygnini. Sometimes, they are considered a distinct subfamily, Cygninae. There are six to seven species of swan in the genus Cygnus; in addition there is another species known as the Coscoroba Swan, although this species is no longer considered related to the true swans. Swans usually mate for life, though 'divorce' does sometimes occur, particularly following nesting failure. The number of eggs in each clutch ranges from three to eight.

Ptarmigan Bird Review

The Rock Ptarmigan is 34–36 centimetres (13–14 in) long (tail 8 cm) with a wing-span of 54–60 centimetres (21–24 in). It is slighter smaller than the Willow Grouse by about 10%. The male's "song" is a loud croaking.

The Rock Ptarmigan is seasonally camouflaged; its feathers moult from white in winter to brown in spring or summer. The breeding male has greyish upper parts with white wings and under parts. In winter, its plumage becomes completely white except for the black tail. It can be distinguished from the winter Willow Grouse (Willow Ptarmigan in North America) by habitat — the Rock Ptarmigan prefers higher elevations and more barren habitat; it is also smaller with a more delicate bill

Monday, November 28, 2011

Fact About Mule

A mule is the result of the mating of a male donkey (jack) and a female horse (mare) to produce a hybrid. The much rarer hinny is the result of mating a female donkey (jennet) with a male horse (stallion) although the hinny is much harder to produce than the mule. The jennet's reproductive system is more efficient at detecting and eliminating foreign DNA than the mare's is. The hinny conception rate is lower and the miscarriage rate is higher. It really isn't possible to distinguish a mule from a hinny by appearance. Mules are anatomically normal and show normal breeding behavior unless gelded (castrated) early in life.

Mules are sterile due to an uneven chromosome count. There are have been a very few rare cases since the 1500s where female mules have been known to produce a foal when mated to a stallion or jack. Males are completely sterile, and as an old muleman said,"Ain't nothing meaner than a stud mule!"

Mules are commonly found around the world in any area where there are donkeys and horses inhabiting the same environment. Mules have been bred by humans for use as riding and pack animals, and for ploughing or any work one does with horses.

The mule's body type and temperament depend on the breed of mare and jack used. Huge draft mules are created by breeding draft horses such as Belgians to Mammoth jacks. They have the size and power of the draft horse with the mule's ability to tolerate heat and less feed. Racing mules are produced using Throughbred mares, and trail mules are often produced from Quarter horses, Paint horses, and Appaloosas. Mules come in any horse or donkey color or combination of both. A mule is easily distinguished from a donkey by looking at the tail. A mule's tail is haired all the way to the top like a horse's tail; a donkey's tail has a tuft on the end like a cow. They compete successfully with horses in all venues including dressage.

The mule has the patience, endurance, sure footedness, sense, and drought tolerance of the donkey, combined with the size, speed, strength and courage of the horse. Operators of working animals generally find mules preferable to horses as mules have harder skin that is less sensitive than that of horses, meaning that mules can deal with climate extremes such as strong sun and rain more easily. They require less food and water than a horse of the same size. The mules hooves are harder than horses hooves, and both the mule and the mules hooves show a natural resistance to disease and insects. Source:a-z-animals
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